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In a blow to free speech Delhi-based publisher Navayana has decided to cancel the agreement for release of the English translation of Sahitya Akademi winner Joe D’Cruz’s first Tamil novel Aazhi Soozh Ulagu (Ocean Ringed World) in the wake of his recent political support for BJP's prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi. <br> <a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/en:Creative_Commons class=extiw title=w:en:Creative Commons>Creative
Commons</a> <a rel=nofollow class=external text href=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en>Attribution-Share
Alike 3.0 Unported</a> license.</p>
Cate Blanchett in Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking.
A scene from Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking. <b>For Democracy</b> A KKM satyagraha before courting arrest Actor Kamal Hassan addresses media after meeting Home Secretary R Rajagopal and some Muslim organisation regarding the controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam', in Chennai. Members of some Muslim organisations addressing  media after meeting with actor Kamal Hassan and home Secretary R Rajagopal regarding Kamal's controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam' in Chennai. File photo of Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy. The Supreme Court stayed the arrest of Ashis Nandy for making remarks alleged to be anti-Dalit at the Jaipur Literature Festival.  Members of the Muslim community protest against the release of Kamal Haasan's movie <i>Vishwaroopam</i> in Madurai. Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy kicked up a row while speaking at a session 'Republic of Ideas' at Jaipur Literature Festival in Jaipur when he said that people from OBC, SC and ST communities were the most corrupt, remarks that came under all round attack. Hours after Nandy made remarks at the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival, an FIR was lodged with the police against him in Jaipur. Dalit activists protest against Ashis Nandy's controversial remarks on corruption outside Diggi Palace, the venue of Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur <b>Salman Rushdie vs all comers</b>
<p> 
Even a virtual Rushdie was banned from the Jaipur LitFest; so imminent, the state said, was the threat of a SIMI attack against the author of <i>The Satanic Verses</i>. Fortunately, the threats turned out to be the state’s own epic work of fiction. After, Rushdie also had a spat with Pankaj Mishra and faced down a stinging review of his memoir, <i>Joseph Anton</i>, by Zoe Heller. Shaheen Dhada and Rinu Srinivasan, who were arrested for their comments over their Facebook post questioning the shutdown in the city for Shiv Sena patriarch Bal Thackeray's funeral, after their release on bail by the Palghar court in Mumbai. A school boy takes photographs as sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik completes a sculpture portraying 15-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women,  in Kolkata. Pakistani girls display a poster while sitting at their desk, as their teacher, not shown, talks to them about 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by a Taliban gunman for her role in promoting girls' education in the Swat Valley where she lives, in a school in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani military spokesman says Yousufzai is in satisfactory condition but cautions that the next few days will be critical. A protester, wearing sunglasses with slogans, stands in front of picture of Philippine President Benigno Aquino III during a rally against the anti-cybercrime law in front of the Supreme Court in Manila, Philippines. Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, burn a representation of a U.S. flag, during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan. Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, hold up the party's flag during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan. Rapid Action Force personnel patrol a street a day after a protest against an anti-Islam film turned violent in Ahmedabad. Several vehicles were burnt and a police station attacked during a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. policemen create a barricade at the end of an over bridge leading to the U.S. Consulate anticipating a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Kolkata. However, the protestors did not turn up. A government vehicle in flames during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.  Women react as they flee the scene after protestors set fire to vehicles in front of a police station  during a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad. Police personnel run away after protesters burnt a police station during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.  Vehicles set on fire by a mob inside the premises of a police station go up in flames during a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.  People shout slogans during a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.  People gather during a protest against Innocence of Muslims, a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.  Female supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, raise their hands during a demonstration against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan. Muslims shout slogans during a protest rally against the film Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Prophet Muhammad, in New Delhi. Scores of Muslims protested against the anti-Islam film produced in the United States after offering their Friday prayers. The sign reads Insult towards Prophet Muhammad will not be tolerated. Punish the guilty. Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. as they march in a protest rally against the anti-Islam film Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu. Pakistani lawyers chant anti-American slogans as they are blocked by police in Islamabad, Pakistan. Angry lawyers broke police barriers and reached near the diplomatic enclave to condemn a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. A Bahraini woman uses an iPad to photograph a rally in Diraz, Bahrain against a film made in the United States that denigrates Islam's founding Prophet Muhammad. A few hundred people participated in the march, chanting slogans against the United States and Israel. Muslims clash with the police during a demonstration against anti-Islam film in front of American Center in Kolkata. Police in action against Muslims who were marching towards American Centre to protest against anti-Islamic film in Kolkata. A Pakistani student listens to a speech at a rally to protest against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad at Karachi University in Pakistan. Pakistani Taliban spokesman says the militant group has announced an amnesty for a minister who offered a $100,000 bounty for anyone who kills the maker of an anti-Islam film. Sri Lankan Muslims hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest outside the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Thousands of Sri Lankan Muslims protested against the American-produced film Innocence of Muslims” that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Bangladeshi Muslims burn a U.S. flag and a coffin of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest over anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. School girls shouting anti-US slogans during a protest march against the Anti-Islam film in Srinagar. A Paramilitary soldier stands guard in front of closed shops during a strike to protest against an anti-Islam film at Budshah Chowk in Srinagar. Indonesian Muslims shout slogans during a protest against an anti-Islam film that has sparked anger among followers, outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia. Muslims burn the U.S. flag during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu. Muslims burn the U.S. flag and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu. A Muslim protester holds a placard during a protest against the anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims and a satirical cartoon published in a French magazine deemed insulting to Prophet Muhammad outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Pakistani protesters rally in Quetta, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Muslim demonstrators march to the U.S. Embassy during a protest against the anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims and the publication of caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad by a French satirical weekly outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Pakistani protesters hold a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama and pastor Terry Jones during a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.  Muslim protesters burn an American flag during a protest against an anti-Islam film produced in the US, in Makassar, Indonesia. The U.S. has closed its diplomatic missions across Indonesia due to continuing demonstrations over the film Innocence of Muslims, which denigrates the Prophet Muhammad. Afghans hold placards reading: Our leader Mohammed during a protest against an anti-Islam film in Kabul, Afghanistan. Muslims protest against an anti-Islam film in Moradabad. Yemeni clerics attend a press conference in Sanaa, Yemen. The group condemned an anti-Islam film and the presence of U.S. Marines in Yemen and airstrikes carried out by U.S aircraft in Yemen. An elite Marine rapid response team has arrived in Yemen's capital in the wake of violent protests at the U.S. Embassy over a film critical of Islam. Sri Lankan Muslims hit with a broom and sandals on a banner carrying portraits of Pastor Terry Jones, left, U.S. President Barack Obama and Christian activist Steve Klein, right, during a protest in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Hundreds of Muslims in Sri Lanka's capital protested against an anti-Islam film produced in the United States, burning effigies of President Barack Obama. Muslim students burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest near the American Center in Kolkata. The students were protesting against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Masked Palestinians throw stones towards Israeli security forces, during clashes erupted after demonstration against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Shuafat refugee camp, Jerusalem. Angry protesters strike a poster showing a portrait of U.S. President Barack Obama during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the U.S. consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan. Hundreds of angry protesters broke through a barricade outside the U.S. Consulate in  Peshawar, sparking clashes with police that left several wounded on both sides. Kashmiri Muslim protesters hurl objects at police during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Brothers of an Afghan mini-bus driver who was killed in a suicide bombing cry at the scene in Kabul, Afghanistan. A female suicide bomber killed 12 people in Kabul in the deadliest single attack claimed to avenge a US film that has sparked a week of deadly protests across the Muslim world. Pakistani protesters burn a representation of a U.S. flag during a demonstration that is part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the US consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan. A Kashmiri Muslim protester jumps over a burning tire set up as a road block during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Banner reads Muslims can sacrifice their precious lives for Prophet Muhammad. A Kashmiri Muslim family watches a protest against the U.S. in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Paramilitary soldiers stand near a water tanker vandalised by protesters in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing the United States as they shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Afghan investigators inspect the wreckage of a suicide bomber's car in Kabul, Afghanistan. Firefighters work to extinguish flames on a government vehicle after it was set on fire by Kashmiri protesters in Srinagar. A Muslim protestor, on ground, tries to block blows as police baton charge during a protest in front of the U.S. embassy in Chennai. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called <i>Innocence of Muslims</i> that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Afghan police stand by burning tires during a protest, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hundreds of Afghans burned cars and threw rocks at a U.S. military base as a demonstration against an anti-Islam film that ridicules the Prophet Muhammad turned violent in the Afghan capital. Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. A Pakistani protester spray paints on the wall of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan. A Pakistani protester holds stone as others hang a flag at the entry of the gate of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan. Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice raise hands during a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan , as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Afghans burn U.S. and Israeli flags in Kabul, Afghanistan during a protest against the Anti-Islam film which has sparked violent reaction all over the Muslim world. Thousands of supporters of the Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan against the Anti-Islam film that has outraged the Muslim world. Kashmiri Muslim students shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Palestinian Hamas supporters burn a U.S. flag during a protest in Gaza City as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Activists of Tamil Nadu Thowheed Jamath during a protest against an anti-Islam film, near the U.S. Consulate in Chennai. Afghans burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest in Khost, south-east of Kabul, Afghanistan. A few hundred of university students protested against an anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Khost, shouting death to America. Activists of Tamil Nadu Muslim Munnetra Kazhagam clash with the police during protest against an anti-Islam film, outside of the U.S. Consulate in Chennai. Muslims burn a representation of an American flag during a protest in Hyderabad. The protest was held against an obscure movie called Innocence of Muslims that mocked Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Iranian parliament speaker Ali Larijani, center, attends a protest, while a worshipper holds up a poster of US President Barack Obama, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Kashmiri Muslim protesters throw stones at policemen during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Female lawyers of Kashmir Bar Association protesting against an anti-Islam Film that sparked tension in Libya, at Lal Chowk in Srinagar. Lebanese Muslim protesters burn the American and Israeli flags during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon. Indonesian Muslims shout slogans as they hold a banner reads Innocence of Muslims is the result of secular democracy during a protest against the anti-Islam film that has sparked anger among followers, outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia.  A man walks over an American flag during a protest against an anti-Islam movie called Innocence of Muslims that mocked Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Hyderabad. Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans during a protest against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Srinagar. An Iranian worshipper holds a copy of the Quran, Muslims' holy book, as the others hold up anti-US and anti-Israel placards and posters showing Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, during a protest, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Police tries to stop Kashmiri lawyers as they shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Srinagar. The low-budget film Innocence of Muslims ridicules Islam and depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman. Since it emerged on the Internet, it has prompted violent protests at U.S. embassies in the Middle East. Muslims shout anti-US slogans during a demonstration against an anti-Islamic film in Amritsar. Bangladeshi Muslims scuffle with the police during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Protestors climb the wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against an Anti-Islam film in Chennai. Protesters hold black flags and a placard showing an image of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai. A Kashmiri Muslim with his face covered burns a mock American flag as others shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called <i>Innocence of Muslims</i> that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Yemeni protesters break a door of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Yemeni protesters, angry over a film deemed as offensive to Islam stormed the complex of the US embassy in Sanaa, defying efforts by riot police to hold them at bay. A vehicle burns during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt as part of the widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. Egyptian protesters chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The graffiti reads, no God but God,   God is great, and Muhammad is the Prophet. The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it in outrage over a film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Ambassador Chris Stevens, 52, died as he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff as a crowd of hundreds attacked the consulate, many of them firing machine-guns and rocket-propelled grenades. A Yemeni protester, left, holds a white flag with Islamic inscription in Arabic that reads, No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet, in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. An Egyptian protester runs from a burning police car during clashes with riot police, unseen, near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. Yemeni protesters break windows of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Yemeni protesters climb the gate of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film <i>The Innocence of Muslims</i> deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, unseen, during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. A Yemeni protester, center, destroys an American flag pulled down as other hold a banner in Arabic that reads, any one but you God's prophet at the U.S. Embassy compound during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi (C), who was arrested on sedition charges, speaks as he comes out of the Arthur Road Jail after his release in Mumbai. A burnt car is seen after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Benghazi, Libya. The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed. Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, second from left, exits Arthur jail after he was released on bail in Mumbai. Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, second from left, speaks after he was released on bail in Mumbai. Trivedi, whose drawings mocked corruption in the Indian government, was jailed on sedition charges in an arrest that was widely condemned Monday as evidence of political leaders' increasing intolerance of criticism. Civil Rights activist Binayak Sen greets Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi who had been arrested on charges of sedition as he arrives for a press conference after he was released on bail  in Mumbai. Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt. US ambassador to Libya CHRISTOPHER STEVENS at the Benghazi consulate after
Islamist gunmen storm it in protest against a US film which showed the Prophet
Mohammed in a bad light. An activist of India Against Corruption  shouts slogans protesting the arrest of cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai. A policeman tries to stop activists of India Against Corruption protesting the arrest of  cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai. An activist of India Against Corruption, center, holding an empty plastic bottle, shouts slogans while protesting the arrest of political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai. Policemen escort political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi to a court in Mumbai. Trivedi whose drawings mock Indian government's corruption has been jailed on a sedition charge. His arrest has been widely condemned as evidence of political leaders' increasing intolerance of criticism. Arrested cartoonist Aseem Trivedi's father Ashok Trivedi and mother Pratibha Trivedi along with others holding a protest against their son's arrest on charges of sedition in Kanpur. Activists of India Against Corruption (IAC) shout slogans during a protest against the arrest of political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi on charges of sedition outside a court in Mumbai. Kanpur-based cartoonist ASEEM TRIVEDI who was arrested and charged with
sedition for a series of loaded anti-corruption toons, gets bail from Bombay HC amid high
drama and media uproar. A Mumbai Court remanded anti-corruption cartoonist and free speech campaigner Aseem Trivedi to police custody till September 16 for allegedly making cartoons that insult India's flag, Parliament and the national emblem, although Trivedi explained that the cartoons intended to display the insult to the nation that is being done by politicians, and do not seek to insult national symbols in any way. Kanpur-based cartoonist Aseem Trivedi arrested on charges of posting seditious contents on his website being produced at court in Mumbai. Tawfiq Okasha, a popular Egyptian TV presenter accused of inciting the killing of the country's new president on air, stands in the defendants cage at the opening of his trial, in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's state news agency said the prosecutor accused Okasha of using his TV program in July and August to incite the killing of President Mohammed Morsi, and of insulting him by calling him an illegitimate leader and a liar. Activist of Hindu Janajagruti Samiti shout slogans against the blocking of their web-portal in Mumbai. Government's attempts to block social media accounts and websites that it blames for spreading panic have been inept and possibly illegal, a top internet expert said . The government’s interference with hundreds of websites, including some Twitter accounts, blogs and links to certain news stories began after rumours fed by gory images said to be of murdered Muslims, that were actually manipulated photos of people killed in cyclones and earthquakes, were spread to sow fear of revenge attacks. The placard reads ban, ban, ban. Twitter has promised to cooperate with the government after the Prime Minister's Office complained to it about objectionable content on six accounts resembling the PMO's official account. As the government blocked the six accounts after Twitter took no action, the social networking portal has communicated to the PMO that it would be locating the unlawful content. Feminist punk group Pussy Riot members, from left, Maria Alekhina, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova show the court's verdict as they sit in a glass cage at a court room in Moscow, Russia. A judge found three members of the provocative punk band Pussy Riot guilty of hooliganism in a case that has drawn widespread international condemnation as an emblem of Russia's intolerance of dissent. A member of the Ukrainian feminist group 'FEMEN' saws down a cross erected in honor of victims of political repression, as others help pull it to the ground, in protest against the Moscow trial of Russian punk group Pussy Riot, in Kiev, Ukraine. A protester holds a sign during a during a demonstration in front of the Russian consulate in support of Russian punk band Pussy Riot in New York.  A Russian judge found three members of the provocative punk band guilty of hooliganism and sentences them to 2 years of jail. The judge blamed them for hooliganism driven by religious hatred and offending religious believers. The three were arrested in March after a guerrilla performance in Moscow's main cathedral calling for the Virgin Mary to protect Russia against Vladimir Putin, who was elected to a new term as Russia's president a few days later. In this photo taken by a cell phone on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, U.S. singer Madonna performs during her concert at Olympic Hall in Moscow, Russia, with the words Pussy Riot on her bare back . Madonna has voiced hope that three feminist Russian rockers on trial for performing a punk prayer against Vladimir Putin are released soon. The pop star told the AP during her concert tour of Russia that she supports freedom of speech and hopes the judge will show leniency. People wear masks as they protest against the Government's alleged restrictive regulation of the internet in Bengaluru. The latest cartoon that is causing a controversy in Tamil Nadu is from a class XII Political Science text book of the NCERT, and drawn by R.K. Laxman.  It relates to the anti-Hindi agitation of 1965 in Tamil Nadu and Marumalarchi Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (MDMK)'s general secretary Vaiko has written to Union Minister for Human Resource Development (HRD) Kabil Sibal, saying the cartoon was a total distortion of history and hurt the sentiments of the people of Tamil Nadu and maligned the Dravidian Movement.
Members of a hacking group, Anonymous India, wear Guy Fawkes masks as they protest against government enacted laws that gives it power to censor different aspects of Internet usage, in New Delhi. The Indian hacker group is a spinoff of Anonymous, an amorphous group of activists, hackers and pranksters whose past targets have included Visa and MasterCard. People wear 'Guy Fawkes' masks as they protest against the Government's alleged restrictive regulation of the internet in Mumbai. A member of a hacking group, Anonymous India, wears Guy Fawkes mask as he protests against Indian government enacted laws that gives it power to censor different aspects of Internet usage, in Mumbai. A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who did not appear at court, holds placards bearing images of him after the verdict was given in his extradition case at the Supreme Court in London. Britain's Supreme Court has endorsed the extradition of WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange to Sweden, bringing the secret-spilling Internet activist a big step closer to prosecution in a Scandinavian court. Assange, 40, has spent the better part of two years fighting attempts to send him to the Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning in sex crime allegations. He has not been charged there. A fan of U.S. pop star Lady Gaga prepares for a flash mob with others at a shopping mall in Jakarta, Indonesia.  Lady Gaga canceled her sold-out show in Indonesia after Islamist hard-liners threatened violence, claiming her sexy clothes and provocative dance moves would corrupt the youth. Faction-riven, the Janata Party fell to a resurgent IndiraGandhi in the 1980 polls. Here, Laxman rubbishes deposed PM Charan Singh. Irfan looks at booth grabbing, having a criminal politician and his armed thugs dissuade an exercise of franchise. Media professionals holding placards during a protest over the recent cartoon controversy in New Delhi. The more things change, the more they stay the same, Ajit Ninan says in a India
Today cartoon on the shift from one-party to coalition politics. Nehru sells the third five-year plan to a drought-hit farmer family in this Shankar critique likening it to a magic carpet ride. JP fights a painfully lonely battle for democracy against a backdrop of ills in this Laxman piece for Times Of India. A visitor to the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg holds his hands over what could be a codpiece accentuating the genitals on a painting entitled The Spear depicting President Jacob Zuma, by South African artist Brett Murray. South Africa's governing party said it will demand the removal of the painting  from the exhibition. This cartoon comments on the relation between the people and the rulers in the Princely States and also on Patel's approach to resolving this issue. Perils of Running a Coalition Government. Shankar has Nehru riding along a tightrope, balancing a tad unbalanced beam. Spot Shastri astride the Public Sector end. This Keshav cartoon in The Hindu has an impoverished man on a parliament-styled
hamster wheel that abounds with anti-poverty exhortations. The constitution makers have to address themselves to very different aspirations. Here is Nehru trying to balance between different visions and ideologies. No fisticuffs please, this is rule of law. Walkout vs thrown out Walkouts The 'rules of the game' The effect of the Parliament's power to sanction money to different ministries. Kutty employs a Dickensian staple (The orphan Oliver asking for more soup) as subtle metaphor for Centre-state relations. Comment of the criminal-politician nexus. The Netaji is afraid of Election Commission. Brushing up the years. How governors are appointed. The anti-Hindi wave. This Chief Minster is not happy even after winning the confidence motion.
Why people want to be ministers. There is no Council of Ministers without the Prime Minister. This cartoon shows how, literally, the Prime Minister 'leads' the Council of Ministers. Universal adult franchise compared to an elephant. They say elections are carnival of democracy. But this cartoon depicts chaos instead. Democracy the umpire. Demand for new states. A TV grab of the Pune campus office of Prof Suhas Palshikar, who resigned as NCERT adviser in the wake of the huge row over a cartoon of B R Ambedkar in school text books, was attacked by a group of persons. Police said Palshikar was unharmed in the attack and three persons have been detained.
Union HRD Minister Kapil Sibal speaks as members show photocopies of a cartoon of BR Ambedkar in an NCERT text-book, in the Lok Sabha in New Delhi. Agreeing that Ambedkar's cartoon in an NCERT textbook was objectionable, HRD Minister Kapil Sibal said orders have been issued to withdraw it and stop distribution of these books, and promised concrete action in the matter. Proceedings in Parliament were disrupted due to turmoil over a cartoon of B R Ambedkar in NCERT's STD XI Political Science text book. BSP Chief Mayawati threatened to stall Parliament proceedings if action was not taken against those responsible within three days. HRD minister Kapil Sibal said there was no question of anybody trying to malign Ambedkar or anybody trying to make fun of him because that I think will be against the secular ethos of our country.  


The cartoon that apparently led to the arrest of a Jadavpur University professor, who has been charged with mailing it using an e-mail account not his own. Mamata: dekhte pachho mukul, shonaar kella? [Can you see Mukul, the Golden Fort -- a reference to Sonar Kela a film by Satyajit Ray which also has a character called Mukul] Mukul: otaa dushtu lok! [Here the Mukul is Mukul Roy, the railway minister: That is a bad man! ]Mamata: Dushtu lok? Vanish! [Bad man? Vanish!]
		Hot seat Peter Heehs with the ‘offending’ book A journalist argues with Chairman of Press Council of India Justice Markandey Katju at a press conference in Lucknow. Katju said in the press conference that the Idea of Lokpal is 'Unworkable'. Police personnel impound a vehicle before a protest against British author Salman Rushdie outside a hotel in New Delhi. In this Saturday, March 17, 2012 handout photo, Indian-born author Salman Rushdie speaks at the India Today Conclave in New Delhi. The controversial author of <i>The Satanic Verses</i> was forced to skip a literature fest in Jaipur owing to protests from a section of Muslims due to the alleged blasphemous content in his 1988 novel. The flex board set up by CPM at Thrukkannapuram in Thiruvananthapuram shows Obama in place of Jesus Christ, in its reworked depiction of the Last Supper which has upset and offended the Christian community in Kerala.
Officials announce the news of calling off Indian born British author Salman Rushdie's video conference at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur. 
The organizers of the Indian literary festival called off a video conference with British author Salman Rushdie following protests by Muslim groups who considered his 1988 book The Satanic Verses blasphemous. FILE - In this Saturday, May 17, 2003 file photo, writer Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses, speaks during the XI Rio de Janeiro International Book Fair in Rio de Janeiro. Rushdie cancelled plans to appear at the Jaipur Literature Festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination because of his controversial book. Rushdie's video address was also cancelled by the owners of the venue fearing violence. Author Romesh Gunesekera, right, signs a petition to reconsider the ban on Salman Rushdie's 'The Satanic Verses' as Indian writer Anni Zaidi, center, looks on at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur. Indian Writer Anni Zaidi, left, requests a visitor to sign a petition to reconsider the ban on Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur. A Muslim stops others from protesting against Booker-Prize winning author Salman Rushdie, in Jaipur. Rushdie cancelled plans to appear at an Indian literature festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination because of his controversial book, 'The Satanic Verses'. Muslims shout slogans against Booker-Prize winning author Salman Rushdie after prayers in Jaipur, Rajasthan. Rushdie canceled plans to appear at a literature festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination. FILE - In this Saturday, May 17, 2003 file photo, writer Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses, speaks during the XI Rio de Janeiro International Book Fair in Rio de Janeiro. Rushdie's visit to India to attend the Jaipur Literature Festival is clouded in uncertainty even as Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot said his trip might lead to security problems. While the organisers say they stand by their invitation to the 'Midnight's Children' author, Gehlot has made it plain to Home Minister P Chidambaram that his visit is being resented by the local people. The Centre today told a Delhi court that there is sufficient material to proceed against 21 social networking sites, including Facebook, Google, Yahoo and Microsoft, for offences of promoting enmity between classes and causing prejudice to national integration. The court had on December 23 issued summons to these sites for allegedly committing offences of criminal conspiracy, sale of obscene books and sale of obscene objects to young persons. Maulana Abdul Rahim Qurashi, Assistant General Secretary All India Muslim Personal Law Board, addressing a meeting of the board in Hyderabad. The Board urged the Centre to deny visa to controversial author of 'Satanic Verses', Salman Rushdie, on the grounds that his participation in the Jaipur Literary Festival would add to the hurt feelings of the Muslims.  External Affairs Minister S. M. Krishna with Russian Ambassador in India, Alexander M. Kadakin at a meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi. India today conveyed to Russia its concerns over the sensitive issue of a Siberian court hearing a petition seeking a ban on Bhagavad Gita and asked it to help resolve the matter.
 Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP), or World Hindu Council, activists burn an effigy jointly representing Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and reservation for Muslims, at a protest in New Delhi. The activists protested against a case filed by state prosecutors in the Siberian city of Tomsk that says a translation of the Bhagavad Gita is extremist because it insults non-believers. <b>Lage raho, Munnabhai!</b> Protests outside Sibal’s residence Members of a youth organisation doing Gandhigiri outside the residence of Union Communication and IT Minister Kapil Sibal over the issue of censoring of objectionable content on social networking sites, in New Delhi. Local Kashmiri photographers Yawar Nazir, left and Showket Shafi wait for treatment after they were assaulted by police and paramilitary forces during a protest in Srinagar. An Associated Press cameraman Umar Meraj and at least three other journalists said they were assaulted by police and paramilitary forces as they covered a protest in Indian-controlled Kashmir. Local journalists have repeatedly complained of harassment and assaults by police in the tumultuous Himalayan territory. <b>India’s pride!</b> Assailant Inder Verma A combo TV Grab courtesy Times Now- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan being roughed up at his chambers and after the incident, in New Delhi. A combo TV Grab courtesy Times Now shows- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan after being roughed up at his chambers and Inder Verma, president of Sri Ram Sene who attacked Bhushan, in New Delhi. A TV Grab courtesy Times Now- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan being roughed up at his chambers in New Delhi. <b>David Barsamian</b>
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“I have worked on Chhattisgarh, the Gujarat pogrom, Narmada dams.... But it’s all about Kashmir. The official narrative must not be contested.” Police at a theatre screening Aarakshan, Mumbai Bahujan Samaj Party activists try to stall the first show of Prakash Jha's newly released film Aarakshan in Thane. People carry a coffin containing the dead body of Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad at Karachi airport in Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents. This July 8, 2008 photo provided by Adnkronos news agency, shows Pakistani journalist and Adnkronos International correspondent Syed Saleem Shahzad during a visit at the Adnkronos agency in Rome. The Pakistani journalist who investigated al-Qaida's alleged infiltration of the navy and told a rights activist he'd been threatened by the country's intelligence agencies was found dead with his body bearing marks of torture, police said in Islamabad. Two days before he went missing, Shahzad had written an article in which he contended that Al Qaida attacked a naval airbase in Karachi after failed talks with the navy to release some arrested naval personnel who had terror links. A Pakistani journalist protests against a killing of a Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad, in Hyderabad, Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents. Syed Saleem Shahzad wrote about terrorism and security for the Asia Times Online and other publications. Police said the 40-year-old's body bore signs of torture when it was found on May 31 after he had been missing for two days. Family members of slain Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad react over his death in Karachi, Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents. Syed Saleem Shahzad wrote about terrorism and security for the Asia Times Online and other publications. Police said the 40-year-old's body bore signs of torture when it was found on May 31 after he had been missing for two days. An undated picture shows Pakistan bureau chief for <i>Asia Times Online</i> Syed Saleem Shahzad in Islamabad, Pakistan. Shahzad went missing in the Pakistani capital over the weekend and was today found dead with his body bearing marks of torture, police said. Two days before he went missing, Shahzad had written an article in which he contended that Al Qaida attacked a naval airbase in Karachi after failed talks with the navy to release some arrested naval personnel who had terror links. Activists carry photographs of a model in a swimsuit and shout slogans against the Australian government in Jammu. The activists were protesting against the depiction of a Hindu goddess on a swimsuit at a fashion show in Australia. A candle-light vigil for Salman Taseer in Lahore <b>Viewfinder</b>
<p>
Mobbed on arrival, Baywatch  babe Pamela Anderson, a guest on a reality TV show, certainly delivered bang for the buck. The va-va-voom effect in a sari fetched her a cool $350,000 plus the adoration of millions of fans here. US actress Pamela Anderson during a TV reality show in Mumbai. Her arrival in the Big Boss house ended up getting timed with the government today asking channels airing the shows Big Boss and Rakhi ka Insaf to shift their telecast between 11 pm to 5 am citing abusive language, objectionable content and divulging of intimate details on the shows. But the TV channel Colors still aired the show at 9 PM, claiming they had not got the government directive, leaving the I&B ministry fuming Yangon : Members of the Myanmar's detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) hold her portraits as they gather at the party's headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar, for her expected release from years of detention on Saturday, November 13. Jailed or under house arrest for more than 15 of the last 21 years, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate has become a symbol for a struggle to rid the Southeast Asian country of decades of military rule. In this photo taken Sept. 14, 2010, activists of the Bharatiya Vidyarthi Sena and the Shiv Sena, burn copies of Rohinton Mistry's acclaimed 1991 novel 'Such a Long Journey' during a protest in Mumbai. 
In this photo taken Nov. 10, 2008, South African writer and Nobel laureate Nadine Gordimer, delivers a speech in Calcutta. Gordimer is leading South African writers in speaking out against proposed laws she fears will muzzle freedom of speech in her homeland. 
<b>Sarkar raj</b> Sambhaji Brigade protesters All India Rajiv Gandhi Brigade activists burn an effigy of Spanish author Javier Moro to protest against his book that allegedly defames Congress President Sonia Gandhi in New Delhi. 
A book on Sonia Gandhi by a Spanish author has created a storm over what is claimed to be a fictionalised account of her life but has been described by her lawyers as containing untruths, half truths, falsehoods and defamatory statements. Author Javier Moro's novel El Saro Rojo (The Red Saree) was first published in Spanish in October 2008 and has been translated in Italian, French and Dutch. But there are fears that its English edition may not be allowed to be published in India Pakistani women rally holding a placard with the name of Prophet Muhammad in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's government ordered Internet service providers to block Youtube today after the social networking site Facebook was blocked on Wednesday amid anger over a page that encourages users to post images of Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Pakistani women affiliated with a religious party rally against the Facebook page Everybody Draw Mohammed Day! in Karachi, Pakistan. A Pakistani court ordered the government to block the popular social networking website Facebook temporarily because of the controversial page that encourages uses to submit images of Prophet Muhammad.

Pakistani students hold a rally against Facebook page Everybody Draw Mohammed Day! in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani court ordered the government to block the popular social networking website Facebook temporarily because of a controversial page that encourages uses to submit images o Islam's Prophet Muhammad, a senior legal official said. 

<b>Banned</b> Pakistan places a ban on social networking site Facebook after a usergenerated contest page set up a ‘Draw Mohammed Day’. Site has 45 mn users there.
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”. A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people.  While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital.  A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article  titled<i>Purdah hai purdah</i> that appeared in the weekly magazine section, <i>Saptahika Prabha</i> of the Kannada daily <i>Kannada Prabha</i> of the <i>New Indian Express</i> group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”. A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titledPurdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”. A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”. A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”. Wither freedom of press? This time it was Shiv Sena activists, in Mumbai, vandalising the office of IBN-Lokmat. Samajwadi Party activists burn an effigy of MNS leader Raj Thackeray to protest the attack on Abu Azmi who was taking oath of office in Hindi, while the party insisted that all members of the state legislative body be given oath in Marathi. Samajwadi Party MLA Abu Azami reacts after being attacked by MNS MLAs when he started taking oath in Hindi, in the Vidhan Bhawan in Mumbai. The four suspended MLAs of MNS being garlanded after they disrupted the oath taking ceremony in Vidhan Sabha, Mumbai. Myanmar's detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi exits the Inya Lake Hotel after meeting with U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell, partially seen behind her, in Yangon, Myanmar. Campbell met Suu Kyi in a visit that marked the highest-ranking talks between an American and Myanmar's detained leader in 14 years.
Activists of 'Sanskriti Bachao Manch' protest against the movie 'London Dreams' insisting that the screening of the movie be stopped immediately, at a theatre in Bhopal.
Apr 14, 2014
In a blow to free speech Delhi-based publisher Navayana has decided to cancel the agreement for release of the English translation of Sahitya Akademi winner Joe D’Cruz’s first Tamil novel Aazhi Soozh Ulagu (Ocean Ringed World) in the wake of his recent political support for BJP's prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi.
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.



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Oct 07, 2013
Cate Blanchett in Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking.

- Courtesy: Sonyclassics.com
Oct 07, 2013
A scene from Woody Allen’s latest film, Blue Jasmine, which was not released in India this Friday as the director objected to anti-tobacco adverts having to be inserted into scenes where characters are shown smoking.

- Courtesy: Sonyclassics.com
Jun 13, 2013
For Democracy A KKM satyagraha before courting arrest

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Feb 02, 2013
Actor Kamal Hassan addresses media after meeting Home Secretary R Rajagopal and some Muslim organisation regarding the controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam', in Chennai.

- PTI Photo/ R Senthil Kumar
Feb 02, 2013
Members of some Muslim organisations addressing media after meeting with actor Kamal Hassan and home Secretary R Rajagopal regarding Kamal's controversial movie 'Vishwaroopam' in Chennai.

- PTI Photo/R Senthil Kumar
Feb 01, 2013
File photo of Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy. The Supreme Court stayed the arrest of Ashis Nandy for making remarks alleged to be anti-Dalit at the Jaipur Literature Festival.

- PTI Photo
Jan 30, 2013
Members of the Muslim community protest against the release of Kamal Haasan's movie Vishwaroopam in Madurai.

- PTI Photo
Jan 26, 2013
Renowned sociologist Ashis Nandy kicked up a row while speaking at a session 'Republic of Ideas' at Jaipur Literature Festival in Jaipur when he said that people from OBC, SC and ST communities were the "most corrupt", remarks that came under all round attack. Hours after Nandy made remarks at the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival, an FIR was lodged with the police against him in Jaipur.

- PTI
Jan 26, 2013
Dalit activists protest against Ashis Nandy's controversial remarks on corruption outside Diggi Palace, the venue of Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur

- PTI
Dec 26, 2012
Salman Rushdie vs all comers

Even a virtual Rushdie was banned from the Jaipur LitFest; so imminent, the state said, was the threat of a SIMI attack against the author of The Satanic Verses. Fortunately, the threats turned out to be the state’s own epic work of fiction. After, Rushdie also had a spat with Pankaj Mishra and faced down a stinging review of his memoir, Joseph Anton, by Zoe Heller.

- Sorit

Nov 20, 2012
Shaheen Dhada and Rinu Srinivasan, who were arrested for their comments over their Facebook post questioning the shutdown in the city for Shiv Sena patriarch Bal Thackeray's funeral, after their release on bail by the Palghar court in Mumbai.

- PTI Photo
Nov 03, 2012
A school boy takes photographs as sand artist Sudarsan Pattnaik completes a sculpture portraying 15-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by the Taliban for speaking out in support of education for women, in Kolkata.

- AP Photo/Bikas Das
Oct 12, 2012
Pakistani girls display a poster while sitting at their desk, as their teacher, not shown, talks to them about 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot by a Taliban gunman for her role in promoting girls' education in the Swat Valley where she lives, in a school in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani military spokesman says Yousufzai is in "satisfactory" condition but cautions that the next few days will be critical.

- AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Oct 09, 2012
A protester, wearing sunglasses with slogans, stands in front of picture of Philippine President Benigno Aquino III during a rally against the anti-cybercrime law in front of the Supreme Court in Manila, Philippines.

- AP Photo/Aaron Favila
Oct 07, 2012
Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, burn a representation of a U.S. flag, during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/Fareed Khan
Oct 07, 2012
Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, hold up the party's flag during a rally against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/Fareed Khan
Oct 04, 2012
Rapid Action Force personnel patrol a street a day after a protest against an anti-Islam film turned violent in Ahmedabad. Several vehicles were burnt and a police station attacked during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/Ajit Solanki
Oct 04, 2012
policemen create a barricade at the end of an over bridge leading to the U.S. Consulate anticipating a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Kolkata. However, the protestors did not turn up.

- AP Photo/Bikas Das
Oct 03, 2012
A government vehicle in flames during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.

- PTI Photo
Oct 03, 2012
Women react as they flee the scene after protestors set fire to vehicles in front of a police station during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

- AP Photo/Ajit Solanki
Oct 03, 2012
Police personnel run away after protesters burnt a police station during a protest against a US-made anti-Islam film and the publication of blasphemous cartoons in France, in Ahmedabad.

- PTI Photo
Oct 03, 2012
Vehicles set on fire by a mob inside the premises of a police station go up in flames during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

- AP Photo/Ajit Solanki
Oct 03, 2012
People shout slogans during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

- AP Photo/Ajit Solanki
Oct 03, 2012
People gather during a protest against "Innocence of Muslims," a film made in the U.S. that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Ahmedabad.

- AP Photo/Ajit Solanki
Oct 03, 2012
Female supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamaat-e-Islami, raise their hands during a demonstration against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, in Karachi, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/Shakil Adil
Sep 28, 2012
Muslims shout slogans during a protest rally against the film "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Prophet Muhammad, in New Delhi. Scores of Muslims protested against the anti-Islam film produced in the United States after offering their Friday prayers. The sign reads "Insult towards Prophet Muhammad will not be tolerated. Punish the guilty."

- AP Photo/Saurabh Das
Sep 28, 2012
Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. as they march in a protest rally against the anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

- AP Photo/Channi Anand
Sep 28, 2012
Pakistani lawyers chant anti-American slogans as they are blocked by police in Islamabad, Pakistan. Angry lawyers broke police barriers and reached near the diplomatic enclave to condemn a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/B.K. Bangash
Sep 28, 2012
A Bahraini woman uses an iPad to photograph a rally in Diraz, Bahrain against a film made in the United States that denigrates Islam's founding Prophet Muhammad. A few hundred people participated in the march, chanting slogans against the United States and Israel.

- AP Photo/Hasan Jamali
Sep 27, 2012
Muslims clash with the police during a demonstration against anti-Islam film in front of American Center in Kolkata.

- PTI Photo/Ashok Bhaumik
Sep 27, 2012
Police in action against Muslims who were marching towards American Centre to protest against anti-Islamic film in Kolkata.

- PTI Photo/Swapan Mahapatra
Sep 26, 2012
A Pakistani student listens to a speech at a rally to protest against a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad at Karachi University in Pakistan. Pakistani Taliban spokesman says the militant group has announced an amnesty for a minister who offered a $100,000 bounty for anyone who kills the maker of an anti-Islam film.

- AP Photo/ Fareed Khan
Sep 24, 2012
Sri Lankan Muslims hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest outside the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Thousands of Sri Lankan Muslims protested against the American-produced film "Innocence of Muslims” that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP/PTI
Sep 22, 2012
Bangladeshi Muslims burn a U.S. flag and a coffin of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest over anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

- AP Photo/ A.M. Ahad
Sep 22, 2012
School girls shouting anti-US slogans during a protest march against the Anti-Islam film in Srinagar.

- PTI Photo/ S Irfan
Sep 21, 2012
A Paramilitary soldier stands guard in front of closed shops during a strike to protest against an anti-Islam film at Budshah Chowk in Srinagar.

- PTI Photo
Sep 21, 2012
Indonesian Muslims shout slogans during a protest against an anti-Islam film that has sparked anger among followers, outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia.

- AP Photo/ Achmad Ibrahim
Sep 21, 2012
Muslims burn the U.S. flag during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

- AP Photo/ Channi Anand
Sep 21, 2012
Muslims burn the U.S. flag and shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest rally against an anti-Islam film which ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Jammu.

- AP Photo/ Channi Anand
Sep 21, 2012
A Muslim protester holds a placard during a protest against the anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" and a satirical cartoon published in a French magazine deemed insulting to Prophet Muhammad outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

- AP Photo/ Lai Seng Sin
Sep 21, 2012
Pakistani protesters rally in Quetta, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Arshad Butt
Sep 21, 2012
Muslim demonstrators march to the U.S. Embassy during a protest against the anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" and the publication of caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad by a French satirical weekly outside a mosque in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

- AP Photo/ Vincent Thian
Sep 21, 2012
Pakistani protesters hold a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama and pastor Terry Jones during a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan as a part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad
Sep 21, 2012
Muslim protesters burn an American flag during a protest against an anti-Islam film produced in the US, in Makassar, Indonesia. The U.S. has closed its diplomatic missions across Indonesia due to continuing demonstrations over the film "Innocence of Muslims," which denigrates the Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Abbas Sandji
Sep 21, 2012
Afghans hold placards reading: "Our leader Mohammed" during a protest against an anti-Islam film in Kabul, Afghanistan.

- AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid
Sep 21, 2012
Muslims protest against an anti-Islam film in Moradabad.

- PTI Photo
Sep 20, 2012
Yemeni clerics attend a press conference in Sanaa, Yemen. The group condemned an anti-Islam film and the presence of U.S. Marines in Yemen and airstrikes carried out by U.S aircraft in Yemen. An elite Marine rapid response team has arrived in Yemen's capital in the wake of violent protests at the U.S. Embassy over a film critical of Islam.

- AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed
Sep 20, 2012
Sri Lankan Muslims hit with a broom and sandals on a banner carrying portraits of Pastor Terry Jones, left, U.S. President Barack Obama and Christian activist Steve Klein, right, during a protest in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Hundreds of Muslims in Sri Lanka's capital protested against an anti-Islam film produced in the United States, burning effigies of President Barack Obama.

- AP Photo/ Chamila Karunarathne
Sep 19, 2012
Muslim students burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest near the American Center in Kolkata. The students were protesting against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo
Sep 19, 2012
Masked Palestinians throw stones towards Israeli security forces, during clashes erupted after demonstration against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Shuafat refugee camp, Jerusalem.

- AP Photo/ Bernat Armangue
Sep 18, 2012
Angry protesters strike a poster showing a portrait of U.S. President Barack Obama during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the U.S. consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan. Hundreds of angry protesters broke through a barricade outside the U.S. Consulate in Peshawar, sparking clashes with police that left several wounded on both sides.

- AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad
Sep 18, 2012
Kashmiri Muslim protesters hurl objects at police during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 18, 2012
Brothers of an Afghan mini-bus driver who was killed in a suicide bombing cry at the scene in Kabul, Afghanistan. A female suicide bomber killed 12 people in Kabul in the deadliest single attack claimed to avenge a US film that has sparked a week of deadly protests across the Muslim world.

- AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid
Sep 18, 2012
Pakistani protesters burn a representation of a U.S. flag during a demonstration that is part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the US consulate in Peshawar, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/ Mohammad Sajjad
Sep 18, 2012
A Kashmiri Muslim protester jumps over a burning tire set up as a road block during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 18, 2012
Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Banner reads "Muslims can sacrifice their precious lives for Prophet Muhammad."

- AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan
Sep 18, 2012
A Kashmiri Muslim family watches a protest against the U.S. in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 18, 2012
Paramilitary soldiers stand near a water tanker vandalised by protesters in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 18, 2012
Kashmiri Muslim protesters burn an effigy representing the United States as they shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan
Sep 18, 2012
Afghan investigators inspect the wreckage of a suicide bomber's car in Kabul, Afghanistan.

- AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid)
Sep 18, 2012
Firefighters work to extinguish flames on a government vehicle after it was set on fire by Kashmiri protesters in Srinagar.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 18, 2012
A Muslim protestor, on ground, tries to block blows as police baton charge during a protest in front of the U.S. embassy in Chennai. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Arun Sankar.K
Sep 17, 2012
Afghan police stand by burning tires during a protest, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hundreds of Afghans burned cars and threw rocks at a U.S. military base as a demonstration against an anti-Islam film that ridicules the Prophet Muhammad turned violent in the Afghan capital.

- AP Photo/ Ahmad Jamshid
Sep 17, 2012
Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary
Sep 17, 2012
A Pakistani protester spray paints on the wall of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/ Fareed Khan
Sep 17, 2012
A Pakistani protester holds stone as others hang a flag at the entry of the gate of the U.S. consulate during a demonstration in Karachi, Pakistan.

- AP Photo/ Fareed Khan
Sep 17, 2012
Thousands of supporters of a Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice raise hands during a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan , as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ K.M. Chaudary
Sep 16, 2012
Afghans burn U.S. and Israeli flags in Kabul, Afghanistan during a protest against the Anti-Islam film which has sparked violent reaction all over the Muslim world.

- AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid
Sep 16, 2012
Thousands of supporters of the Pakistani religious group Jammat-Ud-Dawa Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice take part in a demonstration in Lahore, Pakistan against the Anti-Islam film that has outraged the Muslim world.

- AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary
Sep 15, 2012
Kashmiri Muslim students shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest in Srinagar, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 15, 2012
Palestinian Hamas supporters burn a U.S. flag during a protest in Gaza City as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Hatem Moussa
Sep 15, 2012
Activists of Tamil Nadu Thowheed Jamath during a protest against an anti-Islam film, near the U.S. Consulate in Chennai.

- PTI Photo/ R Senthil Kumar
Sep 15, 2012
Afghans burn an effigy of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest in Khost, south-east of Kabul, Afghanistan. A few hundred of university students protested against an anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Khost, shouting "death to America."

- AP Photo/ Nashanuddin Khan
Sep 14, 2012
Activists of Tamil Nadu Muslim Munnetra Kazhagam clash with the police during protest against an anti-Islam film, outside of the U.S. Consulate in Chennai.

- PTI Photo/R Senthil Kumar
Sep 14, 2012
Muslims burn a representation of an American flag during a protest in Hyderabad. The protest was held against an obscure movie called "Innocence of Muslims" that mocked Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.
Sep 14, 2012
Iranian parliament speaker Ali Larijani, center, attends a protest, while a worshipper holds up a poster of US President Barack Obama, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Vahid Salemi
Sep 14, 2012
Kashmiri Muslim protesters throw stones at policemen during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan
Sep 14, 2012
Female lawyers of Kashmir Bar Association protesting against an anti-Islam Film that sparked tension in Libya, at Lal Chowk in Srinagar.

- PTI Photo
Sep 14, 2012
Lebanese Muslim protesters burn the American and Israeli flags during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon.

- AP Photo/ Mohammed Zaatari
Sep 14, 2012
Indonesian Muslims shout slogans as they hold a banner reads "Innocence of Muslims is the result of secular democracy" during a protest against the anti-Islam film that has sparked anger among followers, outside the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta, Indonesia.

- AP Photo/ Achmad Ibrahim
Sep 14, 2012
A man walks over an American flag during a protest against an anti-Islam movie called "Innocence of Muslims" that mocked Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Hyderabad.

- AP Photo/ Mahesh Kumar A.
Sep 14, 2012
Kashmiri Muslims shout slogans during a protest against an anti-Islam film called "Innocence of Muslims" that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Srinagar.

- AP Photo/ Mukhtar Khan
Sep 14, 2012
An Iranian worshipper holds a copy of the Quran, Muslims' holy book, as the others hold up anti-US and anti-Israel placards and posters showing Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, during a protest, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Vahid Salemi
Sep 14, 2012
Police tries to stop Kashmiri lawyers as they shout slogans against the U.S. during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Srinagar. The low-budget film "Innocence of Muslims" ridicules Islam and depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman. Since it emerged on the Internet, it has prompted violent protests at U.S. embassies in the Middle East.

- AP Photo/ Dar Yasin
Sep 14, 2012
Muslims shout anti-US slogans during a demonstration against an anti-Islamic film in Amritsar.

- PTI Photo/Deepak Sharma
Sep 14, 2012
Bangladeshi Muslims scuffle with the police during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman, in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

- AP/PTI
Sep 14, 2012
Protestors climb the wall of the U.S. Consulate during a protest against an Anti-Islam film in Chennai.

- AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.
Sep 14, 2012
Protesters hold black flags and a placard showing an image of U.S. President Barack Obama during a protest against the anti-Islam film which depicts the Prophet Muhammad as a fraud, a womanizer and a madman in Chennai.

- AP Photo/Arun Shanker K.
Sep 14, 2012
A Kashmiri Muslim with his face covered burns a mock American flag as others shout slogans during a protest in Srinagar. The protest was held against an anti-Islam film called Innocence of Muslims that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/Dar Yasin
Sep 13, 2012
Yemeni protesters break a door of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Yemeni protesters, angry over a film deemed as offensive to Islam stormed the complex of the US embassy in Sanaa, defying efforts by riot police to hold them at bay.

- AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed
Sep 13, 2012
A vehicle burns during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt as part of the widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/Hussein Talal
Sep 13, 2012
Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens.

- AP Photo/ Ibrahim Alaguri
Sep 13, 2012
Egyptian protesters chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/ Nasser Nasser
Sep 13, 2012
A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," " God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." The American ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed when a mob of protesters and gunmen overwhelmed the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, setting fire to it in outrage over a film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Ambassador Chris Stevens, 52, died as he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff as a crowd of hundreds attacked the consulate, many of them firing machine-guns and rocket-propelled grenades.

- AP Photo/ Ibrahim Alaguri
Sep 13, 2012
A Yemeni protester, left, holds a white flag with Islamic inscription in Arabic that reads, "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," in front of the U.S. embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen.

- AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed
Sep 13, 2012
An Egyptian protester runs from a burning police car during clashes with riot police, unseen, near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt.

- AP Photo/Khalil Hamra
Sep 13, 2012
Yemeni protesters break windows of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen.

- AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed
Sep 13, 2012
Yemeni protesters climb the gate of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film The Innocence of Muslims deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic.

- AP Photo/Hani Mohammed
Sep 13, 2012
An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt.

- AP Photo/ Nasser Nasser
Sep 13, 2012
An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, unseen, during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt.

- AP Photo/ Nasser Nasser
Sep 13, 2012
A Yemeni protester, center, destroys an American flag pulled down as other hold a banner in Arabic that reads, "any one but you God's prophet" at the U.S. Embassy compound during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen.

- AP Photo/ Hani Mohammed
Sep 13, 2012


- Illustration by Sorit
Sep 12, 2012
Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi (C), who was arrested on sedition charges, speaks as he comes out of the Arthur Road Jail after his release in Mumbai.

- PTI Photo by Mitesh Bhuvad
Sep 12, 2012
A burnt car is seen after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Benghazi, Libya. The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed.

- AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri
Sep 12, 2012
Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, second from left, exits Arthur jail after he was released on bail in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade
Sep 12, 2012
Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, second from left, speaks after he was released on bail in Mumbai. Trivedi, whose drawings mocked corruption in the Indian government, was jailed on sedition charges in an arrest that was widely condemned Monday as evidence of political leaders' increasing intolerance of criticism.

- AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade
Sep 12, 2012
Civil Rights activist Binayak Sen greets Cartoonist Aseem Trivedi who had been arrested on charges of sedition as he arrives for a press conference after he was released on bail in Mumbai.

- PTI Photo/Shirish Shete
Sep 12, 2012
Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt. An Israeli filmmaker based in California went into hiding after his movie attacking Islam's prophet Muhammad sparked angry assaults by ultra-conservative Muslims in Egypt.

- AP Photo/Nasser Nasser
Sep 12, 2012
US ambassador to Libya CHRISTOPHER STEVENS at the Benghazi consulate after Islamist gunmen storm it in protest against a US film which showed the Prophet Mohammed in a bad light.

-
Sep 11, 2012
An activist of India Against Corruption shouts slogans protesting the arrest of cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/ Rajanish Kakade
Sep 11, 2012
A policeman tries to stop activists of India Against Corruption protesting the arrest of cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/ Rajanish Kakade
Sep 11, 2012
An activist of India Against Corruption, center, holding an empty plastic bottle, shouts slogans while protesting the arrest of political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi, outside Arthur jail where he is being held, in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/ Rajanish Kakade
Sep 10, 2012
Policemen escort political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi to a court in Mumbai. Trivedi whose drawings mock Indian government's corruption has been jailed on a sedition charge. His arrest has been widely condemned as evidence of political leaders' increasing intolerance of criticism.

- AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool
Sep 10, 2012
Arrested cartoonist Aseem Trivedi's father Ashok Trivedi and mother Pratibha Trivedi along with others holding a protest against their son's arrest on charges of sedition in Kanpur.

- PTI Photo
Sep 10, 2012
Activists of India Against Corruption (IAC) shout slogans during a protest against the arrest of political cartoonist Aseem Trivedi on charges of sedition outside a court in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool
Sep 10, 2012
Kanpur-based cartoonist ASEEM TRIVEDI who was arrested and charged with sedition for a series of loaded anti-corruption toons, gets bail from Bombay HC amid high drama and media uproar.

-
Sep 09, 2012
A Mumbai Court remanded anti-corruption cartoonist and free speech campaigner Aseem Trivedi to police custody till September 16 for allegedly making cartoons that insult India's flag, Parliament and the national emblem, although Trivedi explained that the cartoons intended to display the insult to the nation that is being done by politicians, and do not seek to insult national symbols in any way.

- Photo Courtesy: Alok Dixit
Sep 09, 2012
Kanpur-based cartoonist Aseem Trivedi arrested on charges of posting seditious contents on his website being produced at court in Mumbai.

- PTI Photo/Santosh Hirlekar
Sep 06, 2012


- Sorit
Sep 01, 2012
Tawfiq Okasha, a popular Egyptian TV presenter accused of inciting the killing of the country's new president on air, stands in the defendants cage at the opening of his trial, in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's state news agency said the prosecutor accused Okasha of using his TV program in July and August to incite the killing of President Mohammed Morsi, and of insulting him by calling him an "illegitimate leader and a liar."

- AP Photo/Mohammed Assad
Aug 24, 2012
Activist of Hindu Janajagruti Samiti shout slogans against the blocking of their web-portal in Mumbai. Government's attempts to block social media accounts and websites that it blames for spreading panic have been inept and possibly illegal, a top internet expert said . The government’s interference with hundreds of websites, including some Twitter accounts, blogs and links to certain news stories began after rumours fed by gory images said to be of murdered Muslims, that were actually manipulated photos of people killed in cyclones and earthquakes, were spread to sow fear of revenge attacks. The placard reads "ban, ban, ban."

- AP Photo/ Rajanish Kakade
Aug 22, 2012
Twitter has promised to cooperate with the government after the Prime Minister's Office complained to it about objectionable content on six accounts resembling the PMO's official account. As the government blocked the six accounts after Twitter took no action, the social networking portal has communicated to the PMO that it would be locating the "unlawful content".

-
Aug 17, 2012
Feminist punk group Pussy Riot members, from left, Maria Alekhina, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova show the court's verdict as they sit in a glass cage at a court room in Moscow, Russia. A judge found three members of the provocative punk band Pussy Riot guilty of hooliganism in a case that has drawn widespread international condemnation as an emblem of Russia's intolerance of dissent.

- AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel
Aug 17, 2012
A member of the Ukrainian feminist group 'FEMEN' saws down a cross erected in honor of victims of political repression, as others help pull it to the ground, in protest against the Moscow trial of Russian punk group Pussy Riot, in Kiev, Ukraine.

- AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov
Aug 17, 2012
A protester holds a sign during a during a demonstration in front of the Russian consulate in support of Russian punk band Pussy Riot in New York. A Russian judge found three members of the provocative punk band guilty of hooliganism and sentences them to 2 years of jail. The judge blamed them for hooliganism driven by religious hatred and offending religious believers. The three were arrested in March after a guerrilla performance in Moscow's main cathedral calling for the Virgin Mary to protect Russia against Vladimir Putin, who was elected to a new term as Russia's president a few days later.

- AP Photo/Mary Altaffer
Aug 08, 2012
In this photo taken by a cell phone on Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, U.S. singer Madonna performs during her concert at Olympic Hall in Moscow, Russia, with the words "Pussy Riot" on her bare back . Madonna has voiced hope that three feminist Russian rockers on trial for performing a "punk prayer" against Vladimir Putin are released soon. The pop star told the AP during her concert tour of Russia that she supports freedom of speech and hopes the judge will show leniency.

- AP Photo/Oleg Sharan
Jun 09, 2012
People wear masks as they protest against the Government's alleged restrictive regulation of the internet in Bengaluru.

- PTI Photo/ Shailendra Bhojak
Jun 09, 2012
The latest cartoon that is causing a controversy in Tamil Nadu is from a class XII Political Science text book of the NCERT, and drawn by R.K. Laxman. It relates to the anti-Hindi agitation of 1965 in Tamil Nadu and Marumalarchi Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (MDMK)'s general secretary Vaiko has written to Union Minister for Human Resource Development (HRD) Kabil Sibal, saying the cartoon was a total distortion of history and hurt the sentiments of the people of Tamil Nadu and maligned the Dravidian Movement.

- R.K. Laxman
Jun 09, 2012
Members of a hacking group, Anonymous India, wear Guy Fawkes masks as they protest against government enacted laws that gives it power to censor different aspects of Internet usage, in New Delhi. The Indian hacker group is a spinoff of Anonymous, an amorphous group of activists, hackers and pranksters whose past targets have included Visa and MasterCard.

- AP Photo/ Saurabh Das
Jun 09, 2012
People wear 'Guy Fawkes' masks as they protest against the Government's alleged restrictive regulation of the internet in Mumbai.

- PTI Photo/ Santosh Hirlekar
Jun 09, 2012
A member of a hacking group, Anonymous India, wears Guy Fawkes mask as he protests against Indian government enacted laws that gives it power to censor different aspects of Internet usage, in Mumbai.

- AP Photo/ Rafiq Maqbool
May 30, 2012
A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who did not appear at court, holds placards bearing images of him after the verdict was given in his extradition case at the Supreme Court in London. Britain's Supreme Court has endorsed the extradition of WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange to Sweden, bringing the secret-spilling Internet activist a big step closer to prosecution in a Scandinavian court. Assange, 40, has spent the better part of two years fighting attempts to send him to the Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning in sex crime allegations. He has not been charged there.

- AP Photo/ Matt Dunham
May 27, 2012
A fan of U.S. pop star Lady Gaga prepares for a flash mob with others at a shopping mall in Jakarta, Indonesia. Lady Gaga canceled her sold-out show in Indonesia after Islamist hard-liners threatened violence, claiming her sexy clothes and provocative dance moves would corrupt the youth.

- AP Photo/Dita Alangkara
May 24, 2012


- Unnamati Syama Sundar
May 18, 2012
Faction-riven, the Janata Party fell to a resurgent IndiraGandhi in the 1980 polls. Here, Laxman rubbishes deposed PM Charan Singh.

- RK Laxman/ TOI/ India Today
May 18, 2012
Irfan looks at booth grabbing, having a criminal politician and his armed thugs dissuade an exercise of franchise.

- Irfan Khan
May 18, 2012
Media professionals holding placards during a protest over the recent cartoon controversy in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo/ Subhav Shukla
May 18, 2012
The more things change, the more they stay the same, Ajit Ninan says in a India Today cartoon on the shift from one-party to coalition politics.

- Ajit Ninan/ India Today
May 18, 2012
Nehru sells the third five-year plan to a drought-hit farmer family in this Shankar critique likening it to a magic carpet ride.

- Shankar
May 18, 2012
JP fights a painfully lonely battle for democracy against a backdrop of ills in this Laxman piece for Times Of India.

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 18, 2012


- Ninan
May 18, 2012
A visitor to the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg holds his hands over what could be a codpiece accentuating the genitals on a painting entitled "The Spear" depicting President Jacob Zuma, by South African artist Brett Murray. South Africa's governing party said it will demand the removal of the painting from the exhibition.

- AP Photo/Denis Farrell
May 18, 2012
This cartoon comments on the relation between the people and the rulers in the Princely States and also on Patel's approach to resolving this issue.

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 18, 2012
Perils of Running a Coalition Government.

- Ajith Ninan/ India Today Book of Cartoons
May 18, 2012


- Shankar
May 16, 2012
Shankar has Nehru riding along a tightrope, balancing a tad unbalanced beam. Spot Shastri astride the Public Sector end.

- Shankar
May 16, 2012


-
May 15, 2012
This Keshav cartoon in The Hindu has an impoverished man on a parliament-styled hamster wheel that abounds with anti-poverty exhortations.

- Keshav/ The Hindu
May 15, 2012
The constitution makers have to address themselves to very different aspirations. Here is Nehru trying to balance between different visions and ideologies.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012


- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012


- Shankar, Copyright: Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012


-
May 15, 2012
No fisticuffs please, this is rule of law.

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012
Walkout vs thrown out

- Irfan
May 15, 2012
Walkouts

- Irfan
May 15, 2012
The 'rules of the game'

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012
The effect of the Parliament's power to sanction money to different ministries.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
Kutty employs a Dickensian staple (The orphan Oliver asking for more soup) as subtle metaphor for Centre-state relations.

- Kutty
May 15, 2012
Comment of the criminal-politician nexus.

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012
The Netaji is afraid of Election Commission.

- RK Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012
Brushing up the years.

- R.K.Laxman
May 15, 2012


-
May 15, 2012


- Shankar, Copyright: Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012


-
May 15, 2012


- R.K.Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012


- R.K.Laxman/ TOI
May 15, 2012
How governors are appointed.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
The anti-Hindi wave.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
This Chief Minster is not happy even after winning the confidence motion.

- RK Laxman/ The Times of India
May 15, 2012
Why people want to be ministers.

- RK Laxman/ The Times of India
May 15, 2012
There is no Council of Ministers without the Prime Minister. This cartoon shows how, literally, the Prime Minister 'leads' the Council of Ministers.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
Universal adult franchise compared to an elephant.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
They say elections are carnival of democracy. But this cartoon depicts chaos instead.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012


- Ajith Ninan/ India Today Book of Cartoons
May 15, 2012
Democracy the umpire.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 15, 2012
Demand for new states.

- Shankar/ Children's Book Trust
May 12, 2012
A TV grab of the Pune campus office of Prof Suhas Palshikar, who resigned as NCERT adviser in the wake of the huge row over a cartoon of B R Ambedkar in school text books, was attacked by a group of persons. Police said Palshikar was unharmed in the attack and three persons have been detained.

- TV Grab/IBN
May 11, 2012


- Shankar, Copyright: Children's Book Trust
May 11, 2012
Union HRD Minister Kapil Sibal speaks as members show photocopies of a cartoon of BR Ambedkar in an NCERT text-book, in the Lok Sabha in New Delhi. Agreeing that Ambedkar's cartoon in an NCERT textbook was objectionable, HRD Minister Kapil Sibal said orders have been issued to withdraw it and stop distribution of these books, and promised concrete action in the matter.

- PTI Photo/ TV GRAB
May 11, 2012
Proceedings in Parliament were disrupted due to turmoil over a cartoon of B R Ambedkar in NCERT's STD XI Political Science text book. BSP Chief Mayawati threatened to stall Parliament proceedings if action was not taken against those responsible within three days. HRD minister Kapil Sibal said there was no question of anybody trying to malign Ambedkar or anybody trying to make fun of him because "that I think will be against the secular ethos of our country".

- Shankar, Copyright: Children's Book Trust
Apr 18, 2012


- Sandipan Chatterjee
Apr 13, 2012
The cartoon that apparently led to the arrest of a Jadavpur University professor, who has been charged with mailing it using an e-mail account not his own. Mamata: dekhte pachho mukul, shonaar kella? [Can you see Mukul, the Golden Fort -- a reference to Sonar Kela a film by Satyajit Ray which also has a character called Mukul] Mukul: otaa dushtu lok! [Here the Mukul is Mukul Roy, the railway minister: That is a bad man! ]Mamata: Dushtu lok? Vanish! [Bad man? Vanish!]

- courtsey Facebook
Apr 12, 2012
Hot seat Peter Heehs with the ‘offending’ book

- Ramesh K.
Mar 27, 2012
A journalist argues with Chairman of Press Council of India Justice Markandey Katju at a press conference in Lucknow. Katju said in the press conference that the Idea of Lokpal is 'Unworkable'.

- PTI Photo/Nand Kumar
Mar 18, 2012
Police personnel impound a vehicle before a protest against British author Salman Rushdie outside a hotel in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo
Mar 18, 2012
In this Saturday, March 17, 2012 handout photo, Indian-born author Salman Rushdie speaks at the India Today Conclave in New Delhi. The controversial author of The Satanic Verses was forced to skip a literature fest in Jaipur owing to protests from a section of Muslims due to the alleged blasphemous content in his 1988 novel.

- AP Photo/India Today Conclave
Feb 06, 2012
The flex board set up by CPM at Thrukkannapuram in Thiruvananthapuram shows Obama in place of Jesus Christ, in its "reworked" depiction of the "Last Supper" which has upset and offended the Christian community in Kerala.

-
Feb 02, 2012


- Sorit
Jan 24, 2012
Officials announce the news of calling off Indian born British author Salman Rushdie's video conference at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur. The organizers of the Indian literary festival called off a video conference with British author Salman Rushdie following protests by Muslim groups who considered his 1988 book "The Satanic Verses" blasphemous.

- AP Photo/ Manish Swarup
Jan 24, 2012
FILE - In this Saturday, May 17, 2003 file photo, writer Salman Rushdie, author of "The Satanic Verses," speaks during the XI Rio de Janeiro International Book Fair in Rio de Janeiro. Rushdie cancelled plans to appear at the Jaipur Literature Festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination because of his controversial book. Rushdie's video address was also cancelled by the owners of the venue fearing violence.

- AP Photo/ Renzo Gostoli, File
Jan 23, 2012
Author Romesh Gunesekera, right, signs a petition to reconsider the ban on Salman Rushdie's 'The Satanic Verses' as Indian writer Anni Zaidi, center, looks on at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur.

- AP Photo/ Manish Swarup
Jan 23, 2012
Indian Writer Anni Zaidi, left, requests a visitor to sign a petition to reconsider the ban on Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, at the Jaipur Literature Festival, in Jaipur.

- AP Photo/ Manish Swarup
Jan 20, 2012
A Muslim stops others from protesting against Booker-Prize winning author Salman Rushdie, in Jaipur. Rushdie cancelled plans to appear at an Indian literature festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination because of his controversial book, 'The Satanic Verses'.

- AP Photo/ Manish Swarup
Jan 20, 2012
Muslims shout slogans against Booker-Prize winning author Salman Rushdie after prayers in Jaipur, Rajasthan. Rushdie canceled plans to appear at a literature festival after protests from Muslim clerics and warnings that he could be targeted for assassination.

- AP Photo/ Manish Swarup
Jan 17, 2012
FILE - In this Saturday, May 17, 2003 file photo, writer Salman Rushdie, author of "The Satanic Verses," speaks during the XI Rio de Janeiro International Book Fair in Rio de Janeiro. Rushdie's visit to India to attend the Jaipur Literature Festival is clouded in uncertainty even as Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot said his trip might lead to security problems. While the organisers say they stand by their invitation to the 'Midnight's Children' author, Gehlot has made it plain to Home Minister P Chidambaram that his visit is being resented by the local people.

- AP Photo/ Renzo Gostoli, File
Jan 13, 2012
The Centre today told a Delhi court that there is sufficient material to proceed against 21 social networking sites, including Facebook, Google, Yahoo and Microsoft, for offences of promoting enmity between classes and causing prejudice to national integration. The court had on December 23 issued summons to these sites for allegedly committing offences of criminal conspiracy, sale of obscene books and sale of obscene objects to young persons.

-
Jan 11, 2012
Maulana Abdul Rahim Qurashi, Assistant General Secretary All India Muslim Personal Law Board, addressing a meeting of the board in Hyderabad. The Board urged the Centre to deny visa to controversial author of 'Satanic Verses', Salman Rushdie, on the grounds that his participation in the Jaipur Literary Festival "would add to the hurt feelings of the Muslims".

- PTI Photo
Dec 27, 2011
External Affairs Minister S. M. Krishna with Russian Ambassador in India, Alexander M. Kadakin at a meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi. India today conveyed to Russia its concerns over the "sensitive" issue of a Siberian court hearing a petition seeking a ban on Bhagavad Gita and asked it to help resolve the matter.

- PTI Photo/Subhav Shukla
Dec 27, 2011
Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP), or World Hindu Council, activists burn an effigy jointly representing Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and reservation for Muslims, at a protest in New Delhi. The activists protested against a case filed by state prosecutors in the Siberian city of Tomsk that says a translation of the Bhagavad Gita is extremist because it insults non-believers.

- AP Photo/Mustafa Quraishi
Dec 08, 2011
Lage raho, Munnabhai! Protests outside Sibal’s residence

- AFP (From Outlook, December 19, 2011)
Dec 07, 2011
Members of a youth organisation doing "Gandhigiri" outside the residence of Union Communication and IT Minister Kapil Sibal over the issue of censoring of objectionable content on social networking sites, in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo / Vijay Verma
Nov 25, 2011
Local Kashmiri photographers Yawar Nazir, left and Showket Shafi wait for treatment after they were assaulted by police and paramilitary forces during a protest in Srinagar. An Associated Press cameraman Umar Meraj and at least three other journalists said they were assaulted by police and paramilitary forces as they covered a protest in Indian-controlled Kashmir. Local journalists have repeatedly complained of harassment and assaults by police in the tumultuous Himalayan territory.

- AP Photo/Dar Yasin
Oct 13, 2011
India’s pride! Assailant Inder Verma

-
Oct 12, 2011
A combo TV Grab courtesy Times Now- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan being roughed up at his chambers and after the incident, in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo
Oct 12, 2011
A combo TV Grab courtesy Times Now shows- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan after being roughed up at his chambers and Inder Verma, president of Sri Ram Sene who attacked Bhushan, in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo
Oct 12, 2011
A TV Grab courtesy Times Now- Supreme Court lawyer-activist Prashant Bhushan being roughed up at his chambers in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo
Sep 28, 2011
David Barsamian

“I have worked on Chhattisgarh, the Gujarat pogrom, Narmada dams.... But it’s all about Kashmir. The official narrative must not be contested.”

-

Aug 17, 2011
Police at a theatre screening Aarakshan, Mumbai

- Amit Haralkar
Aug 12, 2011
Bahujan Samaj Party activists try to stall the first show of Prakash Jha's newly released film "Aarakshan" in Thane.

- PTI Photo
Jun 01, 2011
People carry a coffin containing the dead body of Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad at Karachi airport in Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents.

- AP Photo/Fareed Khan
Jun 01, 2011
This July 8, 2008 photo provided by Adnkronos news agency, shows Pakistani journalist and Adnkronos International correspondent Syed Saleem Shahzad during a visit at the Adnkronos agency in Rome. The Pakistani journalist who investigated al-Qaida's alleged infiltration of the navy and told a rights activist he'd been threatened by the country's intelligence agencies was found dead with his body bearing marks of torture, police said in Islamabad. Two days before he went missing, Shahzad had written an article in which he contended that Al Qaida attacked a naval airbase in Karachi after failed talks with the navy to release some arrested naval personnel who had terror links.

- AP Photo/ Cristiano Camera, Courtesy of Adnkronos, ho
Jun 01, 2011
A Pakistani journalist protests against a killing of a Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad, in Hyderabad, Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents. Syed Saleem Shahzad wrote about terrorism and security for the Asia Times Online and other publications. Police said the 40-year-old's body bore signs of torture when it was found on May 31 after he had been missing for two days.

- AP Photo/Pervez Masih
Jun 01, 2011
Family members of slain Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad react over his death in Karachi, Pakistan. Hundreds are mourning a Pakistani journalist slain this week after he reported being threatened by intelligence agents. Syed Saleem Shahzad wrote about terrorism and security for the Asia Times Online and other publications. Police said the 40-year-old's body bore signs of torture when it was found on May 31 after he had been missing for two days.

- AP Photo/Fareed Khan
May 31, 2011
An undated picture shows Pakistan bureau chief for Asia Times Online Syed Saleem Shahzad in Islamabad, Pakistan. Shahzad went missing in the Pakistani capital over the weekend and was today found dead with his body bearing marks of torture, police said. Two days before he went missing, Shahzad had written an article in which he contended that Al Qaida attacked a naval airbase in Karachi after failed talks with the navy to release some arrested naval personnel who had terror links.

- AP Photo/Shahzad's Family
May 08, 2011
Activists carry photographs of a model in a swimsuit and shout slogans against the Australian government in Jammu. The activists were protesting against the depiction of a Hindu goddess on a swimsuit at a fashion show in Australia.

- AP Photo/Channi Anand
Jan 19, 2011
A candle-light vigil for Salman Taseer in Lahore

- AFP (From Outlook, January 31, 2011)
Nov 17, 2010
Viewfinder

Mobbed on arrival, Baywatch babe Pamela Anderson, a guest on a reality TV show, certainly delivered bang for the buck. The va-va-voom effect in a sari fetched her a cool $350,000 plus the adoration of millions of fans here.

- PTI

Nov 17, 2010
US actress Pamela Anderson during a TV reality show in Mumbai. Her arrival in the Big Boss house ended up getting timed with the government today asking channels airing the shows "Big Boss" and "Rakhi ka Insaf" to shift their telecast between 11 pm to 5 am citing "abusive" language, "objectionable" content and divulging of "intimate" details on the shows. But the TV channel Colors still aired the show at 9 PM, claiming they had not got the government directive, leaving the I&B ministry fuming

-
Nov 12, 2010
Yangon : Members of the Myanmar's detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy (NLD) hold her portraits as they gather at the party's headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar, for her expected release from years of detention on Saturday, November 13. Jailed or under house arrest for more than 15 of the last 21 years, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate has become a symbol for a struggle to rid the Southeast Asian country of decades of military rule.

- AP/PTI
Oct 26, 2010
In this photo taken Sept. 14, 2010, activists of the Bharatiya Vidyarthi Sena and the Shiv Sena, burn copies of Rohinton Mistry's acclaimed 1991 novel 'Such a Long Journey' during a protest in Mumbai.

- AP Photo
Aug 24, 2010
In this photo taken Nov. 10, 2008, South African writer and Nobel laureate Nadine Gordimer, delivers a speech in Calcutta. Gordimer is leading South African writers in speaking out against proposed laws she fears will muzzle freedom of speech in her homeland.

- AP Photo/Bikas Das-File
Jul 14, 2010
Sarkar raj Sambhaji Brigade protesters

- Dinesh Parab
Jun 08, 2010
All India Rajiv Gandhi Brigade activists burn an effigy of Spanish author Javier Moro to protest against his book that allegedly defames Congress President Sonia Gandhi in New Delhi.

- PTI Photo/Kamal Singh
Jun 02, 2010
A book on Sonia Gandhi by a Spanish author has created a storm over what is claimed to be a fictionalised account of her life but has been described by her lawyers as containing "untruths, half truths, falsehoods and defamatory statements". Author Javier Moro's novel El Saro Rojo (The Red Saree) was first published in Spanish in October 2008 and has been translated in Italian, French and Dutch. But there are fears that its English edition may not be allowed to be published in India

-
May 20, 2010
Pakistani women rally holding a placard with the name of Prophet Muhammad in Multan, Pakistan. Pakistan's government ordered Internet service providers to block Youtube today after the social networking site Facebook was blocked on Wednesday amid anger over a page that encourages users to post images of Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/Khalid Tanveer
May 19, 2010
Pakistani women affiliated with a religious party rally against the Facebook page "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day!" in Karachi, Pakistan. A Pakistani court ordered the government to block the popular social networking website Facebook temporarily because of the controversial page that encourages uses to submit images of Prophet Muhammad.

- AP Photo/Shakil Adil
May 19, 2010
Pakistani students hold a rally against Facebook page "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day!" in Islamabad, Pakistan. A Pakistani court ordered the government to block the popular social networking website Facebook temporarily because of a controversial page that encourages uses to submit images o Islam's Prophet Muhammad, a senior legal official said.

- AP Photo/Anjum Naveed
May 19, 2010
Banned Pakistan places a ban on social networking site Facebook after a usergenerated contest page set up a ‘Draw Mohammed Day’. Site has 45 mn users there.

-
Mar 12, 2010


- Sandeep Adhwaryu
Mar 12, 2010


- Sandeep Adhwaryu
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

- KPN
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titledPurdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

-
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titledPurdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

- KPN
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

- KPN
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

- KPN
Nov 21, 2009
Wither freedom of press? This time it was Shiv Sena activists, in Mumbai, vandalising the office of IBN-Lokmat.

- PTI Photo
Nov 10, 2009
Samajwadi Party activists burn an effigy of MNS leader Raj Thackeray to protest the attack on Abu Azmi who was taking oath of office in Hindi, while the party insisted that all members of the state legislative body be given oath in Marathi.

- AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh
Nov 09, 2009
Samajwadi Party MLA Abu Azami reacts after being attacked by MNS MLAs when he started taking oath in Hindi, in the Vidhan Bhawan in Mumbai.

- PTI / Courtesy TV 9
Nov 09, 2009
The four suspended MLAs of MNS being garlanded after they disrupted the oath taking ceremony in Vidhan Sabha, Mumbai.

- PTI Photo
Nov 04, 2009
Myanmar's detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi exits the Inya Lake Hotel after meeting with U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell, partially seen behind her, in Yangon, Myanmar. Campbell met Suu Kyi in a visit that marked the highest-ranking talks between an American and Myanmar's detained leader in 14 years.

- AP Photo/Khin Maung Win
Nov 03, 2009
Activists of 'Sanskriti Bachao Manch' protest against the movie 'London Dreams' insisting that the screening of the movie be stopped immediately, at a theatre in Bhopal.

- PTI Photo
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Free Speech
Mar 01, 2010
A controversial article on the burqa by Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin, led to protests and riots in Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa’s hometown, Shimoga, killing two people. While one died in police firing, the other succumbed to injuries sustained in stone-pelting in hospital. A 1500-strong crowd took out a procession to express their anger over the article titled Purdah hai purdah that appeared in the weekly magazine section, Saptahika Prabha of the Kannada daily Kannada Prabha of the New Indian Express group. As per the newspaper, it was translated from the original English by “Sindhu”.

- KPN
 
 
 

 
 
 
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